Delhi University first cut-off list for admissions to over 70,000

Delhi University first cut-off list for admissions to over 70,000

The first cut-off list for admissions to over 70,000 undergraduate seats in around 65 Delhi University colleges is probably going to be released on Saturday, university officials have said.

Last year, the primary cut-off list was announced on June 28. This year, however, within the wake of the nationwide Covid-19 lockdown in March and therefore the subsequent delay in board exams and their results, the admission process has been pushed to November. the tutorial session is slated to start on November 18.

While university officials have asked colleges to send their respective college-wise cut-off by Saturday noon, colleges have also expressed difficulty in doing so since they received the registration data only on Friday. Dean (Admissions) Shobha Bagai, who had earlier said that the cut-offs would be announced on October 10, said, “The announcement of cut-offs depends on data sent to us by colleges. we’ve asked them to submit the cut-offs to us by noon Saturday. But we can’t commit on any date,” she said.

Delhi University: Here are five belongings you got to realize during the admission process this year:

1) ADMISSION TIMELINE

Since the admission process is totally online, eligible applicants can seek admissions under the primary cut-off list from Monday to Wednesday. The second cut-off list is going to be announced on October 19. While per annum, applicants had to go to colleges to require admission, thanks to the pandemic this year, the university had made the admission process completely online. Now, students can upload a replica of their mark sheets and certificates on the university website, and that they are often physically verified once the session reopens.

2) HIGH NUMBER OF APPLICANTS

Despite the pandemic, admission to Delhi University colleges this year is unlikely to be easier than the previous years with the varsity receiving its highest-ever number of applications thus far. University officials said they need to receive 353,153 applications for around 70,000 undergraduate seats. Colleges attributed this increase to many factors — including longer registration period, lack of clarity over entrance exams thanks to Covid-19, inability to use to foreign universities due to the lockdown, and therefore the delay within the admission process that has allowed students from multiple state boards to use as their results had been declared till August.

3) APPLICANTS FROM ACROSS STATES

The feasibility of a web admission process is additionally likely to draw in more students from outside Delhi as they don’t need to consider the financial aspect of coming to Delhi to finish the admission formalities, college principals said. Around 60% of the scholars who study at DU are from outside Delhi.

4) CUT-OFFS MAY REMAIN HIGH

Several DU colleges on Friday said that the cut-offs are unlikely to return down from the last year and are, instead, likely to ascertain an increase of 0.5 to 1 decimal point across courses. this might be attributed to an exponential increase in high scorers (90-100%) within the Class 12 Central Board of Secondary Examination this year. Some colleges are likely to stay cut-offs at 100% also . “Cut-offs are set to rise exponentially this point as more number of scholars have scored high marks this year. we’ve decided to stay the cut-offs for a minimum of three courses at 100%,” said a politician from a South Campus college, requesting anonymity.

5) EXPLAINING HIGH CUT-OFFS

Since DU doesn’t have a “first come, first served policy”, colleges need to grant admissions to each student who clears the cut-off. The central university receives applicants from across states, which suggests that faculties need to consider the marking and result system of all boards before setting the cut-offs. the primary cut-off list remains on the upper side, in order that colleges can attempt to control the “over admission” that happens per annum. Last year, despite keeping the very best cut-off across courses and colleges (99%), Hindu College had said that it had admitted more scholars than the available seats for its politics (Hons) course.

Some States reopen schools, colleges after this date

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